How to Get a Quality SkateparkWe want to help you get the best skatepark possible. Check out our proven process below!

How to Get a Top Quality Skatepark

Where to Start

Introduction

We want to help you get a skatepark built in your local community. But most of all we want to help you get the right skatepark for your area. We have seen too many poorly designed, and badly built skateparks to stand idly by. We want to make sure that a well designed, well built, and most importantly – fun place for skateboarders actually gets built in your area. We will take you through each step you will need to take in order to make your dream skate park a reality.

We have also put together contact information for the kinds of people that you can look to for help, as well as the organizations that you will want to work with. These people may change as you move closer to your goal: a park that you will be proud of. We've been building skateparks for 17 years. This guide is the product of literally thousands of hours of experience in getting skateparks built. In that time we have made some mistakes and learnt from them. This guide will help you avoid mistakes and get built a fun, safe and low maintenance skate facilities for your community.

Built right it will enhance the character of the neighbourhood, and integrate with the locals and the users. Beware: building a skatepark takes time. You will meet a lot of obstacles and challenges. You will need to work hard and learn to get on with people you don't like! But you will meet like minded friends and neighbours along the way, you will find help in the most unlikely of places and you will look back on your skatepark much wiserand ready to shred.

We hope that this guide is helpful.

  • Commit yourself for the Long Haul - Building a Skatepark Takes Time
  • Find some fellow skaters to help you form an initial group: See Step 2.

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First Group Meeting

Making a working Party

Finding some fellow skaters to help you form an initial group will be relatively easy. Start by getting your friends involved. Set up a facebook group, put up posters at school, ask at your local skate shop if you can put a sign up there or your existing park if you have one.

But don't stop at skaters who will use the park, think about parents or friends who will spend time watching or waiting for a skater, .

Think about a name for your group. Sounds simply but once you have a name you can be referred to as a group. You may wish to look at forming yourself as a charity. This will help you with fundraising and will help people take you seriously. For information on group forming go to URL.com

Police: The police are the ones who are asked to move you on from the library steps etc. They will be able to help convince local councils of the need fro a skatepark. They know too well that a town without a skatepark is a skatepark.

Make a plan of when you meet. Set dates and email them to everybody. Not everybody will turn up, but if you have dates it will progress

  • You can not do this alone! Get your group together.
  • Form yourselves as a group and give yourselves a name.
  • Set a time and place for your first meeting.

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Who to Involve?

Identify the main stakeholders.

skatepark stakeholders

A skatepark is valuable to many people. Different kinds of people will feel some level of “ownership” over the skatepark and all of them will have important input on the creation or design of the skatepark. These people are called stakeholders:

Primary users: these are the skaters who will use the park, spectators who enjoy watching the skaters, and parents or friends who will spend time watching or waiting for a skater.

Neighbours: these are not only the people who live immediately adjacent to the park, but also anyone who can get to the park on a short walk, drive in the car, or ride on the bus.

Businesses: local businesses near the skatepark or in the local area. Skateboarder-oriented businesses are a good start but don't limit yourself to these.

Police: The police are the ones who are asked to move you on from the library steps etc. They will be able to help convince local councils of the need fro a skatepark. They know too well that a town without a skatepark is a skatepark.

Council: About 95% of skateparks are built on council property so you will need their help in obtaining a site to build the skatepark. The UK has a over 11,000 different councils and depending where you live your first point of call could be a parish council, a town council or a larger City or Borough council. You will meet a mixture of people in the council: some who donate their time for free to help their local community, and then there are the paid council employees such as town planning or the Parks Department (who will have to manage and maintain the skatepark). Your task is to find the ones who want to support the development of positive public facilities.

At you first meeting you will need to discuss many aspects a draft Agenda is here to help you structure your meeting.

  • Identify the key people you need to talk to.
  • Split the work between you, you will need to phone or email.

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Council and Planning

When things get tough

skatepark planning permission

About 95% of skateparks are built on council property so you will need their help. There are many was to approach this. Getting a petition together is a coot idea before approaching the council. When it is seen that your petition has the support of the community and that there is plenty of demand for a skatepark you are more likely to be taken seriously from the offset.

A petition does not need to be complicated an example of a petition for a skatepark can be downloaded here. Collection email addresses helps you keep in touch with your supporters.

petitions can also be useful for demonstrating to fund raisers that there is support. Once your petition is ready to go, get as many skaters and skatepark supporters out there to ask people to sign it. Kids who skate who are still in school can do a super job of getting a lot of signatures. Go to neighbourhood events like farmer’s markets, street fairs, block parties, and the like

Use online methods too: launch an e petition at XXX URL and promote it on your facebook page. But do not let this replace the physical gathering of support as the opportunity to explain person to person helps spread the work of your skatepark plans and gather a network of supporters. You never know when you will bump into somebody that can help you

Be carefully to be extremely polite. Avoid reinforcing any negative stereo types that people may already have of skaters.

When you have your petition. Write a covering letter and send copies to your local councillors, ask if you can attend a town council meeting to discuss your proposed skatepark.

Before meeting the council make sure you have prepared checklist 2 and 3. Having facts and details to hand will show how seriously you are taking this

  • Get support - a petition helps this be visible
  • Arrange to meet the council with information to hand

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Consultation and Design

Great skateparks start with Great Design.

skatepark design

    Most funding bodies will require a design to show that you are serious about your project. This is where a conceptual design can be useful. When people see your conceptual design they will be much more compelled to contribute time or money to it. A skatepark usually goes through two design phases. The first phase is a conceptual design phase where a user or designer will create a rendition of the park that shows it in the space it will occupy and tries to capture the general essence of a potential design.

    Please contact us, we can discuss with you what you require and turn it into a conceptual skatepark design. Remember that this document will be what you use to get people interested therefore you need the best looking and most professional conceptual design you can get!

    As the project takes shape we will take your conceptual design and turn it into something that can be built for the budget you have available. This phase requires a professional skatepark designer and consultation. Skatepark design is usually around 10% of the overall cost, but doing the design up front allows you to get the exact design you want. It also allows a tendering process where you can compare the costs of the skatepark builders. At the end of the design phase you will have a final design document that shows the park in its exact location, drawn to scale with an accurate topography, and a really close estimate on construction costs. Most designers can also produce construction documents during this phase, which the builder will need in order to create the park as designed.

  • Get a list together of the different features you would like
  • Contact us!

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Fund Raising for Skateparks

How to write a killer skatepark funding application

FUND RAISING ** FROM PLAYCRETE **GOES HERE.

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Tendering

The good the bad and the verbous.

skatepark tender

Tendering GOES HERE.

  • Don't reinvent the wheel with costly long tenders.
  • Do get into your tender all YOUR site specific details and requirements.

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Build Time

How to get the best job from your contractor.

skatepark builders

BUILD PROCESS GOES HERE.

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Skate Jam

Party Time!

SKATE JAM GOES HERE.

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Maintenance

How to look after your new skatepark.

Maintenance GOES HERE.

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